Worlds first Solar Powered Sports Car

 

Can a road-legal car be powered by the Sun alone? One Australian company believe so and they’re planning to unveil a scaled-down version of their proposal later this year.

Called “The Immortus,” the two-person vehicle is the work of EVX Ventures an electric vehicle technology startup based in Melbourne, Australia. The car is decked out in solar panels, covering up to eight square meters (86 square feet), and also has a battery to store energy, between five and 10 kilowatt-hours. So light is the car though, 500 kilograms (1,100 pounds) when empty and 700 kilograms (1,550 pounds) when fully laden, it is able to run on just solar power alone. 

This is all possible thanks to the low mass-to-power ratio of the car. It is also extremely aerodynamic while still looking “compelling and stylish,” EVX co-founder and CEO Barry Nguyen said to IFLScience. The car also doesn’t use normal road tires, but rather tires specially designed for so-called solar races – cars that are powered by the Sun. 

Using a combination of battery and solar power, the car will apparently be capable of reaching up to 160 kilometers (100 miles) per hour. On solar power alone, it can reach up to 80 kilometers (50 miles) per hour.

And perhaps most interestingly, Nguyen said that the car would be able to run perpetually on just solar power, giving it an infinite range, in theory, so long as it didn’t exceed 60 kilometers (37 miles) per hour and the Sun was continuously shining. Still, that's pretty impressive. However, Nguyen stressed that the idea of the technology was to use solar cells in tandem with existing vehicles.

“We see the solar cells as a range extender technology in everyday driving, rather than the solar cells capturing more energy than it consumes for practical use,” he said. “However, uniquely, the range is infinite when there is consistent sunshine cruising at 60 km/h.”

EVX plans to unveil a one-quarter scaled version of their car at the SEMA show 2015 at the Las Vegas Convention Center in November. A leading electric vehicle research and development group at the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne is also involved in the project.

When it is eventually released, Nguyen said the car is expected to retail for about $370,000 (£240,000), and sales of more than 100 are not expected. The car will be road legal “under individually constructed vehicle regulations” in Australia and the U.S., according to Nguyen. 

The team plans to test a full-scale version of the car by the end of 2016, providing they can raise enough money for a working prototype.

 

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Read how to avoid a drained battery HERE

Read about light weight Solar Panels HERE

Read 5 great tips to get the most out of your Solar Panels HERE

Read our comprehensive guide on Inverters HERE

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Article author

Ian

ian@itechworld.com.au

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Solar Panels for Caravan

12V Solar Panels

 

Get FREE energy from the sun with iTechworld’s portable folding solar panels. Designed in Australia, these state of the art panels will easily power your fridge, microwave, kettle, TV and much, much more! Don’t purchase cheap, imitation solar panels; get the best without spending a fortune! iTechworld panels feature:

  • A-Grade Mono-Si Crystals which are the highest quality cells on the market
  • Padded Zip Up Bag which offers great portability and easy storage
  • Folding, Collapsible Stand which allows the panels to fold into a small easy to store unit  
  • 5m Alligator Clips which allows ample cord length between panel and battery
  • Heavy duty and durable hinges, locks and corners ensuring long sustaining durability
  • Toughened Glass Covering to protect the cells from the elements

 

Solar Power for 4x4, caravan, camper trailer, boat and motorhome

iTechworld offers the panels in 120w, 160w or 200w option. These solar panels are perfect for free campers, caravanners, 4WDers or anyone looking to harness FREE power from the sun!

 

 

 

These panels are moving fast! Offer valid for one week only while stocks last.

 

Call us on (08) 9472 7200 to receive the Solar Panel Special

 

 

Read how Generator Inverters work HERE

Read iTechworld Generator Reviews HERE

Read how to use a Generator Inverter HERE

Read how to avoid a drained battery HERE

Read about light weight Solar Panels HERE

Read 5 great tips to get the most out of your Solar Panels HERE

Read our comprehensive guide on Inverters HERE

Read about the benefits of travelling with Solar Power HERE

 

Article author

Ian

ian@itechworld.com.au

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Solar Panels and Battery

 

12v Solar Panels

More evidence emerged this week of the imminent arrival of the solar storage revolution. First was a report by the Deutsche Bank, the latest to predict that solar will become the dominant energy source by 2050, displacing other traditional energy such as fossil fuels.

“Over the next 20 years, we expect the electricity market to double to $US4 trillion and expect the solar industry to increase by a factor of 10. During this timeframe, the solar industry is expected to generate $5 trillion of cumulative revenue,” said the report.

The study sees solar expanding rapidly in developing countries such as India.

“By the year 2050, we expect global solar penetration rates to increase to 30%. We also see solar penetration rates increasing more rapidly in developing economies. India for example has recently announced targets to reach 100GW of solar capacity by 2022.”

The solar storage revolution

But it is affordable solar storage which the bank describes as being at the heart of the revolution. Calling it the “next killer app” because it will help with metering and accessing the grid, the bank states the importance of storage in the rapid expansion of solar power.

“We believe reduction(a) in solar storage costs could act as a significant catalyst for global solar adoption, particularly in high electricity markets such as Europe.”

Reinforcing the was an ABC article last week which quoted CQ University professor Peter Wolfs as saying his team was researching ways for people with solar power to access stored energy during natural disasters. As the recent cyclones in the North have shown, the loss of power is a major problem for those affected by these natural disasters.

However Professor Wolfs said it was possible for those with solar energy to disconnect from the grid during such times, thanks to solar energy and storage.

“You can separate your house. If you actually disconnect your house from the network during a power outage you can form what is called an island and you basically operate off your solar energy and your energy stored in a battery.”

Calling the falling price of the storage battery for electric cars the real “game changer”, he predicted that further drops in price will encourage more homeowners to add a battery component to their solar system.

“…the price of batteries has dropped steadily at about 10 to 15 per cent each year, so in a handful of years, three to four years, you’ll probably find there will be an increasing demand for batteries going into houses.”

So all signs point to a solar storage revolution at the vanguard of solar energy as the dominant power source of the future. The opportunities for Australia, with its wide open spaces and wealth of sunlight, are of course, endless. The chance to become a true renewable energy superpower (as Australia was once described by the Spanish Foreign Minister) may lie in investment in not just solar energy, both domestic and large array, but also in solar battery storage.

 

Read how Generator Inverters work HERE

Read iTechworld Generator Reviews HERE

Read how to use a Generator Inverter HERE

Read how to avoid a drained battery HERE

Read about light weight Solar Panels HERE

Read 5 great tips to get the most out of your Solar Panels HERE

Read our comprehensive guide on Inverters HERE

Read about the benefits of travelling with Solar Power HERE

 

Article author

Ian

ian@itechworld.com.au

Read more +

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